Temples of Angkor

In December 2019, I enjoyed participating in a photography workshop in Cambodia lead by Ian Robert Knight of Photo Workshop Adventures (www.photoworkshopadventures.com). It was an excellent opportunity to photograph the people and sights of Cambodia. The instruction, arrangements, and companionship all combined for an incredible experience. This trip consists of three galleries: Temples of Angkor (this one), Cambodian River Cruise and Village (to be published in the future), and Sights of Cambodia (to be published in the future).

Cambodia, officially the Kingdom of Cambodia, is a country located in the southern portion of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia. It is 69,898 square miles in area, bordered by Thailand to the northwest, Laos to the northeast, Vietnam to the east, and the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest.

The sovereign state of Cambodia has a population of over 15 million. Buddhism is enshrined in the constitution as the official state religion and is practiced by more than 97% of the population. Cambodia's minority groups include Vietnamese, Chinese, Chams, and 30 hill tribes. The capital and largest city is Phnom Penh, the political, economic, and cultural center of Cambodia. The kingdom is an elective constitutional monarchy with a monarch, currently Norodom Sihamoni, chosen by the Throne's Royal Council as head of state. The head of government is the Prime Minister, currently Hun Sen, the longest-serving non-royal leader in Southeast Asia, ruling Cambodia since 1985.

Angkor was the capital city of the Khmer Empire. The city and empire flourished from approximately the 9th to the 15th centuries. The city houses the magnificent Angkor Wat, one of Cambodia's most popular tourist attractions.

The word Angkor is derived from the Sanskrit nagara (नगर), meaning "city." The Angkorian period began in AD 802, when the Khmer Hindu monarch Jayavarman II declared himself a "universal monarch" and "god-king" and lasted until the late 14th century, first falling under Ayutthayan suzerainty in 1351. A Khmer rebellion against Siamese authority resulted in the 1431 sacking of Angkor by Ayutthaya, causing its population to migrate south to Longvek.

The ruins of Angkor are located amid forests and farmland north of the Great Lake (Tonlé Sap) and south of the Kulen Hills, near modern-day Siem Reap city, in Siem Reap Province. The Angkor area's temples number over one thousand, ranging in scale from nondescript piles of brick rubble scattered through rice fields to the Angkor Wat, said to be the world's largest single religious monument. Many of the temples at Angkor have been restored, and together, they comprise the most significant site of Khmer architecture. Visitors approach two million annually, and the entire expanse, including Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom, is collectively protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. (Wikipedia)

I want to thank John Batdorff and Staci Prince of johnbatdorff.com for their curating, Lightroom, and website assistance.

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